Archive for the ‘coffeehouses’ Category

Worlds of Pharmakopeia VII: Chocolate Delights, Slavery & Gluttony

Posted: December 1, 2015 in Africa, African Atlantic Slave trade, agricultural crops, American natural wonders, American slavery, aristo-parasites, aristocracy, artisan workshops, Asia, avarice, bad death, bitter taste, bons bons, cacao, cacao beans, cacao powder, cakes, candies, canella cinnamon, capitalism, capitalist production, carcinogens, chocolate, chocolate bars, chocolate beans, chocolate butter, chocolate capitalists, chocolatiers, coca, coffeehouses, colonialism, consumers, cookies, cooks, cuisine, cultural genocide, culture, currency, death, desserts, diabetes, digestives, drink of the gods, drinking rituals, drugs, elites, empires, erotica, European colonial empires, exotica, Flower Wars, food identity, food transformations, fruits, gastronomy, genetically modified ingredients, genocide, gluttony, gourmets, grinding, grinding process, Guinea, history, honey, hot cocoa, huitzilopochtli, human body, human civilization, Industrial Capitalism, inventions, Izcoatl, knights, leisure, luxury, mass murder, Mayan estates, Mercantile Capitalism, Mexica-Aztec Empire, milk chocolate, Moctezuma I, Moctezuma II, mole, murder, native garden delights, nuts, obesity, pastilles, pharmacopeia, physical senses, plantation killing centers, Portuguese Slave Trading Empire, pralines, production, products, Quetzalcoatl, royalty, rulers, slave export crops, slave trading, slavery, snacks, social classes, social estates, sugar, sweet chocolate, Switzerland, taxes, Tenochtitlan, the body, Theobroma Cacao, tlaloc, tlatloani, tobacco, trade, tribute, Triple Alliance, vanilla, vintage desserts, weight gain, Western Hemisphere, xocolatl
Tags: , ,

Theobroma_cacao_treeCacaoXocolatl-Spicy-Aztec-Hot-Chocolatexocolatl_CodexNuttalChocolateria SpainGirls-On-Cocoa-Plantation-Trinidad-British-West-IndiesChocolate-house-london-c1708 - for aristos onlyCocoa-Child-LaborerParis-Pascal-Caffet-chocolatesChocolate capitalism and GMOs

In the strange, occult worlds of pharmacopeia, few drugs have escaped the repressive clutches of European sadists and madmen.

The reasons for non-prohibition often refer to a particular exotic drug’s negligible effects on the mind. If the drug causes havoc with the sinful body, and yet does not induce much of a mental change, then the elixir transforms into a good and marketable digestible. Such is the modern story of Chocolate, or as the Mexica-Aztecs referred to it, in their language of Nahuatl, Xocolatl.

The 1430s AD was a consequential decade for human civilization. In China, the Han Chinese, Ming Dynasty established a naval fleet in order to extend the economic influence of the Empire. Yet during the same period, agricultural disasters, famine and pestilence hit the Chinese rural valleys, and so the naval empire had to end. In Indochina, the Empire Ayutthaya, (modern Thailand or Siam), conquered the great empire of the Khmer at Angkor Wat (modern Cambodia).

In Europe, the religious wars and Crusades of the Catholic Papacy and Orthodox Christianity continued. First, they fought against the Muslim Turks, who surrounded the Second Rome, Constantinople, on both flanks, Asia Minor and Greece. The Teutonic knights maintained their violent forays into the northeast, against both Poland and Lithuania. The Catholic Holy Roman Emperor eventually defeated the Protestant Hussites, (influenced through Jan Hus), in the Czech lands.

In the southwest, the Spanish knights advanced their attacks against the Moors, or Muslims, in the region of Nasrid Granada. The Church continued its noxious insistence on the conversion of Europe’s Jews, whether through persuasion, legal harassment, or even the sword.

The French Royal forces began to push out the English Plantagenet royal armies from French territory, and a German, by the name of Johannes Gutenberg, developed the first printing press.

Italian artists finally moved away from the medieval, Byzantine-influenced figure painting of long faces and wide eyes, to more realistic portraits, using the ocular mirror-reflection method. The Venetian Empire possessed the most powerful naval army, and the most heinous slave trading, mass murder, sugar plantation system in the Mediterranean.

With the Pope’s mandate for the Christianization and enslavement of the pagans, the Portuguese Empire traded for gold in west Africa, and especially with the Mali Empire in Timbuktu. Due to this trade, this same Empire would later claim slave prisons and colonies on the western coast of sub-Saharan Africa, in a region referred to as Guinea. The Portuguese colonial navy initiated European Civilization’s most heinous mass murder scheme in human history: the Atlantic African Slave Trade. Europe’s invaders had yet to conquer the Western Hemisphere.

This decade also featured the political-military consolidation of the Mexica-Aztec Empire. The emperor, or Tlatloani, had the name of Izcoatl. Izcoatl was a great warrior and political leader who merged the military Triple Alliance of the three most powerful cities: Tenochtitlan, Texcoco and Tlacopan, in central Mexico.

He also oversaw the construction of the great buildings inside the grand city of Tenochtitlan. The two pyramid apexes represented: the God of Agriculture and Water, Tlaloc, and the greater structure, the God of the Mexica: war, blood and fire, Huitzilopochtli.

His successors would continue conquer lands for imperial tribute – until the unfortunate death of Moctezuma II, during the Spanish invasion of the 1520s. One of the coveted lands for tribute, or for taxes, were the southern Mayan farms of cacao beans. When grounded, those cacao beans transformed into a dark and powerful, yet delicious, bitter drink, called Xocolatl.

Towards the end of his glorious reign, Izcoatl ordered the priests to consecrate the temples for the grand sacrifices and coming religious festivals. The emperor and the noblemen drank Xocolatl in the courts of the palace. They sipped Xocolatl cold with ice, inside of large, dark red ceramic bowls. The cooks mixed in cornmeal to make the froth thicker. The royal preparers also added honey to soften the bitter taste, and then the local spices of red chilies, annatto red color, and canella cinnamon, all of which gave the icy Xocolatl the appearance of human blood.

The Aztec priests had their long black hair drenched in red blood dye. The Jaguar skinned and Eagle feathered knights were in attendance, and they were all in the presence of the feathered serpent-god, Izcoatl-Quetzalcoatl emperor.

All of them gulped the blood-colored, darkened froth, which transformed the participants into a mental state of rapture. They sat around a large and low stone table, and continued to taste the bowls of delight, meanwhile royal musicians played military drums and flutes, and the priests burned pungent copal incense. All of the six human senses flourished under this military reign.

Emperor Xocolatl’s body was the blood and oil to the mental states of war bounty, the delight of death, and sacrificial festivities.

Through these intense royal Mexica rituals, Moctezuma I, the successor of Izcoatl, initiated the Flower Wars. Aztec knights engaged in noble combat-contests with their enemies, such as the Tlaxcaltecans, in order to increase their military courage and fighting abilities. The great market of Tenochtitlan even used cacao beans as currency. Xocolatl had finally united, both in body and spirit, or tonalli, with the drink of the Gods.

Xocolatl, or its Latin name, Theobroma Cacao, like other Western Hemisphere wonders, such as tomatoes, corn maize, squashes-zucchinis-pumpkins, potatoes, red-green chili peppers-paprika, coca, tobacco, avocados, annatto, amaranth, peanuts-cashews-pecans-sunflower seeds, papaya-guava-pineapple, wild berries, common bean legumes, and vanilla, would permanently transform European cuisine – and even world gastronomy.

These Western Hemisphere native, garden delights now find themselves at every world table: the Americas, Europe, Africa, Asia and Oceania. European colonialism has transformed Chocolate Cacao once again, and it has cut off its sacred origins from Mesoamerica.

The first methods represented the African killing centers or the Americas, or within its infamous slave plantations. Chocolate plantings coincided with tobacco, sugar and coffee crops, all of which functioned as export commodities on the Atlantic slave trade.

European investors would later add industrial concoctions into the chocolate mix, which gave the drug – from the once extinct Mesoamerican gods – a new identity. European food capitalists introduced the dark-thick cacao to ravenous sugar, silky cow’s milk, and the sweet tooth decadence of fruits and nuts.

Chocolate is not just a drink anymore; instead, consumers can purchase the drug in cakes, cookies, candies, bars, creamy spreads, chips, white and cream colors, powders while cooks have added it to fine dishes, such as the Mexican recipe of mole.

Chocolate has entered the fine drug Valhalla of vintage wines, sweet liqueurs, pungent tobacco cigars and expensive bottled spirits. This drug is also ubiquitous inside many processed GMO, sugary snacks, which destroy the fragile human body. For those gourmets of gluttony, the physical price leads to obesity and diabetes.

During the decade of the 1580s, in the Hispano-American lands, Spanish ecclesiastics and other elites began to partake in the leisurely enjoyment of the drink. In the seventeenth-century, the 1600s, Mercantile Capitalism exploded chocolate into the refined tastes and idle pleasures of European aristo parasites, representing the first two social estates, or classes, the nobles and the clergy.

Coffeehouses in London started to serve the hot chocolate brews, and in Paris, the first artisan workshops of chocolate emerged, calling themselves, chocolatiers. Those chocolate artisans sold a most expensive delight, called bons bons.

On the American continent, every single Euro-American colonial power: the Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, French and English ensured that their sugar, salt, coffee and tobacco slave plantations, had to leave a few grounds for the cultivation of chocolate beans. The European colonial monsters gave the African slaves more work to perform before their short, brutal lives, and even more cruel deaths.

Like Sugar and Coffee export commodities, Chocolate production also violated the horrible existences of kidnapped African chattel. The European aristo rage for hot chocolate, or hot cocoa, and exquisite chocolate candies, called pastilles, would not subside.

In the eighteenth-century, the 1700s, Europeans became so enamored with chocolate that inventors developed mechanisms in quickening the pulverization of beans into cocoa powder. The French and the English became quite adept at this grinding process. Thanks to the such technology, the European working classes began to partake in the ‘drink of the Gods.’

It was during the 1800s, in Europe and the Americas, and especially in Switzerland, where chocolate factories invented industrial schemes that transformed chocolate to the consumer product of today.

First, they used machines to remove the chocolate butter from both the beans and powder during the grinding down process. Second, the factories added sugars, fatty nuts, and whole white milk into the mix, all of which created a finer, creamier and more delicious chocolate, free from its bitter origins. Third, they created assembly lines that formed the butter, powder, sugar, nuts and milk into bite sized candies, called pralines.

Some of the more notable names of the European-American Chocolate capitalists included: Stollwerck, Berwaerts, Cadbury, Ghiradelli, Lindt, Tobler, Hershey and Nestle. All social classes enjoyed the chewing, eating and drinking of chocolate.

Nowadays, most of the worlds’ chocolate bean production occurs in west Africa. Apparently, the chocolate capitalists still treat and pay their workers like slaves.

Chocolate still lives among our innumerable products on the supermarket shelves, yet massive food corporations combine it with high amounts of sugar, and then mix it all with horrid GMOs, or genetically modified products. All of those carcinogens destroy the delicate human body. Chocolate is still delicious, yet it eventually leads to gluttony, fast weight gain, and if abused, obesity.

Chocolate was once the food of the gods – found in the secret halls of Mayan and Aztec royalty. Later in history, European colonials invaded the Americas, destroyed their grand cultures, and stole their wondrous products.

European mercantile capitalism then murdered millions of Africans in order to process American plants, inclusive of the other European addictions, such as sugar cane, coffee beans and tobacco leaves. Ultimately, European technology transformed Chocolate through the processes of industrial capitalism, so that it is extremely rich and tasty. This process will also destroy the tenuous human body.

In fin, the Chocolate drug, with its sordid history, exposes Modern European Civilization’s profound culture of avarice, luxury and gluttony.

 

 

Worlds of Pharmakopeia VI: Coffee and the Café, Stolen from Africa

Posted: September 26, 2015 in Africa, African slave trade kidnapping, African Slavery in Americas, Africans, alcoholic bar dens, Americas, arch criminals, Asia, Atlantic slave trade, Bahia, Black Gold, boiled water, bowel movements, Brazil, brutality, cafe, caffeine, cane cutting, Cannabis Sativa, capitalism, Caribbean, Cartagena Colombia, Central America, Ceylon, chocolate, coffea arabica, coffee, coffee beans, coffee consumption, coffee grinds, Coffee production, coffee-tobacco addicts, coffeehouses, colonial Brazil, colonial Latin America, colonial slavery, colonialism, colonization of plants, conflict, corporate coffee chains, criminality, cruelty, Cuba, cultural appropriation, dead slaves, death, death camps, death work infernos, drug commodities, drug stimulants, drugs, dying art of conversation, economic elites, Ethiopia, Euro-Colonial thieves, Europe, European colonialsm, extermination killing centers, factory labor, fazendas, genocide, gentilehommes, gentlemen, Global Monopoly Capitalism, gold, Guadeloupe, Haiti, hashish, history, humanity, hyperactivity, Industrial Capitalism, intoxicants, Islam, Islamic world culture, Jamaica, Java Sumatra Indonesia, Kaldi, La Serenissima, labor, labor control, Latin America, legal crime, male spaces, Martinique, mass murder, Mercantile Capitalism, merchant stores, merchants, Mocha Yemen, Modern European Civilization, modern life, modern times, monopolies, mosques, murder, murder of slaves, murderers, Nicotiana Tabacum, Ottoman World Empire, overwork, pharmakopeia, plant drugs, plant hostages, plantation labor, Portuguese slave owners, Portuguese slave traders, production, quilombos, sacred plants, sadism, Saint-Domingue, Sao Paolo, savagery, skin color, slave escapes, slave factories, slave hostages, slave labor, slave masters, slave plantations, slave prison system, slave rape, slave rebellion, slave ships, slave trade centers, slave trafficking, slave transport, slavers, slavery, social sacrament, soft drugs, spiritual elixir, Sublime Port of the Sultanate, Sufis, sugar, sugar cane, Suriname, tea leaves, the State, Third Rome, tobacco, torture, tropical climates, Turkish coffee, upper class parasites, Venetian Sea-Slave Empire, Veracruz Mexico, victims, wealth, Western Hemisphere, wine, work breaks, work rituals, work schemes, worship, Yemen
Tags: , , , , ,

Coffea_arabicaCoffee_Arabian_Coffea_Arabicaroasted coffee beanscoffee_plantationSlaves-in-the-yard-of-a-coffee-farm-Vale-do-Paraíba-Bresil-1882-_ENLARGECoffeePlantationslavesjapaneseworkers BrazilTurkish-Coffee-HouseEnglish colonial coffeehouseCafe culture across modern europe_American hipster-weirdo cafeCorporate coffee break

slaveryinbrazilbydebretold coffeehouse culture

Modern European civilization has cursed all of humanity. This curse now also includes all of the multiple autochthonous nations suffering inside of the European continent.

We all live as mental slaves to the petty hatreds, ego manias, sufferings and ignorance that first raped that same continent some two thousand years ago. Even worse is that we cannot turn back the historical clock: Earth’s humanity is moving on a clear and vile path to violent suicide.

Dinosaurs had their millions of years of glory, and soon the darkened farewell of time will arrive for us too. The putrid excrement and historical brutality surrounding the plant-drug of Coffea Arabica, or Coffee, proves such statements.

In Sao Paolo, Brazil, the regular people told tales about the murders that took place in late 1700s. Even with the expulsion of the Jesuits, their protected Guarani native nation, the discovery of gold in Minas Gerais, and the complete extermination of the coastal Tupamori native nation, the slave-plantation system in Portuguese colonial Brazil had recently transformed into a massive African Death Camp.

In northern Brazil, Bahia and Marañao, there weren’t any more Tupamori and Guarani native slaves to kidnap and work to death. Only pretos, or black victims, died en masse on the plantations, called Fazendas, deep in the red-hot blood pools of African flesh, mixed with dirty sea salt.

Some of the slave owners-traders-mass murderers dumped their weakened, useless slaves into the South Atlantic for shark feed. Other masters simply sardine packaged their slaves, in order to send them to the more sadistic fazendas in the south of the colony where the slave traffickers lived, called Paulistas. Sao Paolo is a now a Latin American megalopolis, but at one time, with Cartagena, Colombia, it was one of the slave trafficking centers of colonial Latin America.

Most of the slave fazendas produced sugar and manioc. But a new crop entered the evil world of African slavery in the Americas: coffee, or cafe. This plantation slave work was almost as brutal as sugar cane cutting and processing. The torturous labor required heavy hand work and bending of the body of the African in order to grab enough of the ripened red beans. The small factories later dried, heated and ground the beans down to a darkened hue resembling excrement and the African skin color. These small factories abused their African slave labor horribly. In southern colonial Brazil, the average lifespan working on a coffee slave plantation was around seven years.

There was one Portuguese white, or branco slave owner, arrayed in the pony tail, vest coat with tails, and knee breeches of late Eighteenth-century look, who used a peculiar method in maintaining control over his slaves. Some slaves escaped from the death-work infernos and became quilombos, or escaped slaves. This slave owner wanted complete labor control over his kidnapped African victims and the avoidance of any and all escapes.

He would usually purchase a sickly group of famished Africans recently off the slave ships. He then forced his slaves into a horizontal line on his plantation. None of them understood Portuguese, so he picked out the weakest of the bunch, often a young adult, skinny, almost dying African, and the owner then beat the kidnapped African to death, with the weapons of his choice, in front of the entire group. The shock of the murder would get the job done. This human monster never did any prison time for his mass murders. Most of this slave-owning class-criminals lived as respected white men within the black coffee-sugar white infernos of colonial Brazil.

Coffee production helped stabilize and augment the African slave plantation system in the Americas. Colonial Brazil was not the only place where such killing centers existed. During the late 1700s, the French also increased their African slave operations in Saint Domingue, (Haiti), Martinique and Guadeloupe, through the black gold of coffee. Sugar was the main export crop, but Coffee followed right behind it.

The British began coffee production in its colony of Ceylon, but soon switched to tea leaves. The Dutch also began coffee production on its colonial Malay islands of Java and Sumatra, (Indonesia). Unto this very day, Coffea Arabica maintains its associations with the most brutal conditions of capitalism: slavery, child labor, putting workers in debt to their owners, and murdering the poor through overwork. The irony regarding the massive kidnapping rings, ruthless slavery, and cruel murder system within colonial coffee, was that the coffee bean became another hostage from Africa.

Euro-Colonial thieves, kidnappers, mass murderers, and slave masters, with other elite arch criminals, have transformed the Coffee bean into the worldwide soft drug commodity of today.

The African elixir of coffee is the ultimate soft drug-stimulant with its high possession of caffeine. It doesn’t have any of the depressant effects of alcohol, nor does it contain the quick ego spikes of coca leaf. Because of its stimulant magic, coffee is now the prerequisite for billions of humans during their dreaded morning rituals, pathetic work schemes, and after meal snacks.

It has become the shared social sacrament for modern life’s rituals: friendly conversations, dating games, and hobby group meet ups. Coffee has even transcended into the drug pre-requisite for modern life, and the synthetic struggle against drowsiness in our modern times. The sleep of modern humanity has never been the same.

Coffee had its first cultivation in the highlands of Ethiopia, in the region of Kaffa. Legend has it that an Ethiopian farmer named Kaldi was the first human to successfully grow it. After the Islamic world culture took possession of most of Arabia, the Levant, Mesopotamia, North Africa and Iberia, Islamic merchants discovered the wondrous concoctions of this bean. They crushed the beans into a fine powder, and through boiling the grounds with water, created a liquid paradise.

The Koran, the Muslim holy scriptures, condemned the abuse of alcohol intoxicants, while this drug did not make people stupid, aggressive, nor act foolish. In fact, Coffee transformed its users into a more alert, intelligent and chatty group. Islam had found the sacred wine of spiritual elixir. Its center of trade was in Mocha, Yemen, where a great urban civilization existed, featuring the world’s first tall buildings and where almost every conceivable spice from Asia to Africa had its display vats in the merchants’ stalls.

Sufi mystics began to use coffee wine both during their orations of the sacred Koran and their worship ceremonies of dance, song, psalms and prayers. Coffee even joined with the magical herb of Hashish residues to become the drugs of choice across Islamic civilization, from the far east representing the Great Muslim Emirates of India to the far west, Al-Andalus in Modern Spain. Like farmers’ milk and beehive honey, Coffea Arabica mixed in good company with the toke of Cannabis Sativa.

When the Ottoman Turks conquered Constantinople in 1453, they became the Third Rome in competition with the Russian Czarist Empire and the Papal States in Italy. Under this great Turkish Islamic Civilization, the first ‘cafes’ opened. The cafe became an integral social space in a Muslim man’s life. After midday prayers at the mosque, Muslim men could gather at the cafe and enjoy fine, elevating conversation over some delicious Turkish coffee.

As Christendom, representing the Europeans, began to fight wars against Muslim Turkish Empire, called the Sultanate of the Sublime Port, they also discovered the wonders of the Coffee Drug. First, the Venetian Sea-Slave Empire, or La Serenissima, began to trade in the roasted black beans. Coffee became synonymous with wealth and upper class parasites, while having a ‘bitter, but good taste.’ The rest of Europe had to grab a piece of the blackened pie.

Europeans, always experts in the art of stealing and appropriating non-European cultures, and then proclaiming themselves the originators, tried to monopolize the cultivation and trade of coffee. We return to the evil system of African slavery in Brazil.

During the middle of the seventeenth-century, the 1600s, the first coffeehouses and cafes opened across Europe. Gentlemen across Europe visited the cafes, imbibed the brews, and discussed art, street philosophy – and politics. Women and royal authorities also became nervous about these contentious male spaces.

In Paris, the main cafe was right next to the Comédie Français. Did the royal emperor of France, Louis XIV, want French gentilehommes discussing politics and religion after seeing a work of Molière? The royal authorities in London closed down many of the coffeehouses, due to ‘issues of State.’

By the eighteenth-century, the 1700s, the British slavers and colonial murderers began to cultivate the beans on their sadistic slave plantations in Jamaica, as both the French did in Haiti and the Portuguese had earlier done in Brazil. The Spanish followed with their own coffee plantations stretching from the expropriated Mayan lands of Guatemala and Honduras, to the fields around Veracruz, Mexico and Cartagena, Colombia. They later planted coffee around the massive Sugar-African slave estates of Cuba. The Dutch joined the Coffee, Sugar, Slave triumvirate, which created extensive plantations in their American-Caribbean colonies of Bresil-Aruba-Curaçao-Suriname.

With Industrial Capitalism in full motion around Europe and North America, during the middle of the nineteenth-century, the 1800s, Coffee took the lead as the beverage of choice for factory laborers. Coffee also goes well with another herb drug, Nicotiana Tabacum, or Tobacco. The modern work ritual-habit had birthed. Better to have coffee-tobacco addicts than drunks.

By this historical epoch, the European corporate entities had overtaken the Arabs, Africans, Asians and Muslims as the premier sellers of the international brew. Coffee was a lot cheaper to consume. The owners loved it too: more work with cheaper wages and labor costs.

And so it continues to this very day, with special thanks to the coffee corporate chain of Starbucks, the price of Coffee has increased across the globe. Still, coffee consumption remains cheaper than spending money in local alcoholic dens with rude bartenders, (most of whom really aren’t trained bartenders anyway), and crazed, degraded customers who can’t handle their drinking. Coffee doesn’t turn you into a pathetic fool, although it does encourage excessive bowel movements, and it can make one ‘a little edgy.’

Unlike the European varieties, local cafes in the States, meaning coffee-house cafes, now often attract a motley clientage. The list includes bored-rebellious teenagers, pathetic hipsters, lonely, older male spinsters, unsuccessful folk guitarists, social cross sections of unemployable men, ex-drunks and junkies on their 12 step breaks, pseudo-Anarchist ranters, and other, assorted bizarre characters. As an unemployed PhD weirdo in the humanities, I unfortunately include myself in this group.

The article of this essay drinks at least three to four cups of coffee per day. I know some Anarchists that drink even more cups of coffee as a daily custom.

Coffee is a soft, wonder drug. It is the perfect stimulant for both the draining life of the wage slave and for encouraging the dying art of conversation. Coffee tastes great after a delicious home-made meal, while it often encourages a quick run to the toilet – and if one feels a need for an emergency work break.

European civilization has destroyed another sacred plant and bean, all in its desire to control the commodity under global monopoly capitalism. European colonials had first stolen and murdered millions of humans, animals and plants across the Western Hemisphere, or the Americas, as they named it.

They soon expropriated Tobacco, Chocolate and Coca Leaf. They have done the same across Asia, appropriating Tea, Sugar and Cannabis, and now comes Africa, the plundering of Coffee, Ivory, Gold, Diamonds, Scarce Metals, and most ominously – millions of kidnapped and murdered Africans, bought, sold, worked, murdered en masse.

European colonialism has thus murdered the African in order to process their own native African plant, while millions of native Africans have died horrendously across the foreign soils of the Americas. This peculiar genocide has yet to receive its Holocaust Museum.

Only the sickman of human civilization could have invented such nefarious history.