Archive for the ‘gunpowder’ Category

Gun Culture Exhibit J: Firearms revolutionizing History & Culture

Posted: September 1, 2016 in 223 ammunition, 38 Special, 44 Magnum, 7.62 x 39 ammunition, 9 mm semi-auto, AK-47 rifle, America, ancient warfare, armaments, armorers, arms, arts of murder, Assassins, automatic, ball, barrel, battlefield, bayonet charge, bayonets, blasts, breech, breech loader, Britain, bullet casings, caliber, carbines, cavalryman, chambered rounds, Colt Pistol, combatants, detachable magazine, dueling, dueling pistols, Enfield Rifle, European Renaissance, extermination of life, field armies, Flintlock Rifles, gas cylinder, government criminality, guerrilla warfare, gun accuracy, gun assembly, gun culture, gun disassembly-reassembly, gun hammer, gun rod, gun spring, gun technology, gunpowder, hammer cock, hand cannon, heat, heavy weaponry, historical actors, historical artifacts, history, infantryman, inserted magazine, instruction, invention, Japanese Samurai, killing efficiency, la baïonette, le mousquet, light weaponry, load, masterpieces of destruction, Matchlock Rifle, mechanical science, modern inventions, modern warfare, muskets, mutilations, muzzle loader, muzzle rods, percussion caps, powder pouches, religions, revolvers, rifling, round, shot, shot volleys, smoothbores, sniper shooter, soldiers, state assassins, stockpile of weapons, Tang Dynasty, technology of extermination, the enemy, tube magazine, weaponry, Wheel Lock Rifles, Winchester Lever Action Rifle, wounding operations
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Crap historians often relay the same boring and trite tales: great men, particular dates and life changing battles.

There are deeper folds within the trite tales, such as the history of pharmacopeia, the evil works and historical lessons of empires, the wrong views and institutional lies of religions, states and ideologies – and ultimately, the technology of extermination, often meaning the arts in the destruction of human life.

There exist three different historical methods within the arts of physical extermination, or legal state murder: torture, imprisonment – and firearms, or the technology of quick and brutal weaponry.

The firearm is one such artifact from our long and terrible history in the destruction of life. Torture works for any sadist, and the State has the monopoly on imprisonment, but the firearm is open to both the State and non-state historical actors.

Empires love firearms for the embrace of war and ideologies, while tyrannical states stockpile weapons in order to murder their enemies and destroy their own consciences. Then there are the regular humans who need them for both fighting against their own tyrants and for defending themselves from criminals. The firearm is however, somewhat different from world history’s earlier weapons.

The long list of ancient warfare has included the chariot, the horse, the elephant, the dog, the catapult, the supply wagons, the fireball, the burning oil caskets, the castle, the fortress, the ship, the dungeon, the siege machine, the pike, the spear, the crossbow, the arrow, the poisoned dart, the club, the moral law, the discipline, the courage, the spy, the battle organization, the battlefield dynamic, the shield, the battle armor, the paint, the gong, the trumpet, the bell, the fire smoke, the poisoned water, the difficult terrain, the cannon, the banner, the mace, the dagger and the sword.

The true firearm was only a modern invention. The gun, rifle, or hand cannon, with gunpowder and shot, represented a deadly gift from East Asia, China and Japan, and then grew in detail during the European Renaissance of the fourteenth-century, or the late 1300s.

The firearm was more of a thinner type of cannon, which shot hard objects through the combination of extreme heat and force. Both an infantryman and cavalryman could carry those weapons on their hips or saddles, and then hold them in their hands for combat.

The firearm’s goal was not just to exterminate life, or to cause grievous bodily wounds, but also to mutilate and maim, which often forced enemy soldiers to exit the combat fields. The firearm has been the great leveler of life destruction. The guerrilla can fight the state assassin. The revolutionary can fight the tyrants’ thugs. While hunting for food in the wild, the firearm has created an easier task for both killing animals, eating and surviving.

During the long historical reign of the sword, spear and pike, the soldier, and for many years previous, had to learn well and regularly practice such weapons. But with the firearm, a few days of instruction in the assembly disassembly of the weapon, the safety protocols, the cleaning of the different parts, and the practice of shooting and sighting in, could make a capable soldier.

There have been some firearms that have not only equalized the art of killing between unequal combatants, but they have also changed world history and culture.

Particular weapons were thus able to transform the battlefield through facilitating the victory of one violent force over another one. A certain group of those firearms were either more efficient in killing-wounding operations, or more accurate on the field. Others were lighter for carry and often facile for quick shooting. A few of those same weapons even had stronger durability during critical reload-release-shot cycles.

All game changing, revolutionary firearms have transformed world mechanical sciences and the arts of killing for the greater humanity.

We first travel backwards to the Tang Dynasty of China, around a thousand, five hundred years ago, with the invention of gunpowder for hand cannons. This great invention is still necessary for the firing of any gun or rifle. The ignited heat force of the primer blasts the gunpowder, (now inside of modern ammunition casings), pushing the shot-bullet out of the receiver-breech, through the barrel-bore, and towards its target.

The Matchlock Rifle was the first evolutionary cannon held by individual soldiers. They used them as smoking, volley fires on the enemy, (1400-1500s). Although Europeans produced such hand cannons, and especially the Spanish and Portuguese naval empires, the Japanese samurai would also use such weapons to great effects during contentious infantry, cavalry and chariot battles.

In the mid 1500s, it was not just the Protestant Reform that hit Germany. German armorers or gunsmiths had perfected the art of Rifling, where they cut grooves into the bores of barrels in order to achieve a smoother, more accurate shot. The basic problem was the black gunpowder filth that gummed up the interior bore, and so the art of gun cleaning also emerged.

During that same historical period, another German gunsmith had developed a smaller hand cannon, but instead of using a matchlock, which took a lot of time to load, reload and shoot, this weapon now used a Wheel Lock. They were also smaller than the matchlocks. In fact, they became the first mini-cannons or pistols. Gentlemen across Europe wanted such weapons, not just for military field combat, but also for duels – and even assassination.

Just in time for the English Civil War, (the 1640s), French gunsmiths had invented the great Flintlock Rifle, which was the final adjustment to the whole gun lock system. There was no match wick, no wheel to push, just a hammer that ignited the flint, and in turn ignited the gunpowder and ball. The shot was quicker, but those weapons were terribly inaccurate.

By the beginning of the 18th century, the 1700s, every European army was using such guns. These weapons had the names of the le mousquet, or musket, avec la baïonette, or bayonet. European armies would line up on a plane field, shoot volleys, and when the shot gave out, walk towards the enemy, called bayonet charges. European military tactics would never remain the same.

Eventually, even these guns and tactics also went out of style with better technology, but gentleman preferred the smaller versions, as the most excellent dueling pistols. Dueling continued well into the early years of 1900s. A true gentleman had his box set of two flintlock dueling pistols, with balls, powder pouches and muzzle rods, or barrel jammers.

It wasn’t until the early part of the 1800s, the decade of the 1820s actually, with the invention and common use of the Percussion Cap for firing muzzle loaded rounds near the breech, which had finally made the flintlocks obsolete. Soldiers could shoot to kill or maim in the rain – and duelers too.

A British gunsmith amazingly designed a pistol with a movable round revolver, holding four to six bullets. This weapon became The Colt Revolver of 1835. Military officers could easily load the cartridges through the holes of the revolver. It was a single shot with a hammer, which then ignited the primers of the bullets.

The shooter simply cocked the hammer, shot the round, and then the next round of the revolver was chambered. After the revolver was empty, the pistol man had to remove the casings. It was this gun that helped the created the magical and deadly Wild West in America.

The British armorers also produced the first accurate rifle, which would transform the American Civil War. The American Civil War, (1860-65), began with the old battlefield army lines facing each other, and ended with modern trench warfare of steel, blood and attrition.

This breakthrough weapon was the 1853 Enfield Smoothbore Rifle. The Smoothbore was still a muzzle loader, so the soldier had to squash the bullet and powder cartridge down with the rod – but the final shot was deadlier. The casualties on both sides of the conflict showed the effects.

After the American Civil War, American armorers had built, ‘The Gun that Won the West,’ or the 1873 Winchester Repeating Lever Action Carbine. This lighter, repeating rifle possessed a tube magazine with up to ten rounds loaded. With every lever push down, the magazine loaded another round into the chamber for firing. A good shooter could knock off around ten shots within a few seconds. Cowboys, braves, outlaws, lawmen, frontiersmen, farmers and miners, all possessed these indispensable guns.

We again return to our German armorer masters. So by the end of the 19th century, Mauser perfected the bolt-action rifle with sights for combat. This deadly accurate weapon allowed a trained shooter to insert a bullet into the chamber, and then close the bolt-action, and with just a tight squeeze of the trigger, the energy pushed the hammer to the bullet – and the rest was history. This weapon birthed the glorious sniper shooter.

During this same historical epoch, German gunsmiths also constructed the first semi-automatic rifles, all of which used an inserted magazine of rounds that fit directly under the chamber. Simply racking the bolt-action back, chambered the next round.

We end our historical story, with the Russian version of the semi-automatic and automatic rifle, developed after World War II, The Kalashnikov AK-47 Rifle. This battlefield rifle using German WW II 7.62×39 ammunition, and with a particular gas cylinder, heats up greatly during the firing process. Some desperate fighters have even caused flames to shoot out from the bore.

Yet, this masterpiece of destruction remains functional in whatever weather, or in whatever combat situation. It can shoot rounds effortlessly even if not cleaned in months. Due to its amazing livability, armies, paramilitaries and guerrillas have used this rifle as the go-to weapon of choice. It has even entered the cultural iconography of revolutionary combat, found on insignias and photos of guerrillas across the globe, and on country flags in Africa.

Human combatants have used their firearms to kill lots of people through the annals of world history. Such is the nasty story of the Human Condition under Civilization. This system of suffering and misery will never change.

Conflict also created culture, and the firearm, or the gun, represents a human invention, which has not only revolutionized the art of killing other life forms – but it has also changed our world culture, through both science and art.

Humanity has created great religious temples, yet who actually built them, and then who owned the property to use them – and had permission to live inside of them? Human systems have manufactured endless supplies of pharmacopeia, but who controls the markets to sell and regulate them – while who have been the ignorant victims of their scams and abuse?

Armorers have fabricated stronger and efficient weapons for physical extermination – and all states, governments and authorities now stockpile them. Yet, who often faced the other side of such weapons – with no weapons to shoot back?

Always remember this melancholic, historical truth.

 

Worlds of Pharmakopeia III: Opiates, Drugs of the Sweet Death

Posted: July 19, 2014 in Afghanistan, Africa, African-American ghettos, Amerikan Empire, artists, Asia, Basque Country, Bayer Company, bedridden sick, black gold, Black Panthers, bohemians, Boxer Rebellion, British East India Company, cannabis, capitalism, Charles Baudelaire, China, Chinese Communist Revolution, Chinese Nationalist Revolution, CIA, cinema, Colombia, colonialism, cool, counterculture, criminals, death, diarrhea, dictatorships, doctors, dope, Dorian Gray, drogue, drug addicts, drug dealers, drug prohibition, drugs, Dutch naval empire, dying patients, Egypt, empire, epiciers, ETA, eternal youth, eugenics, Europe, fashion models, FBI, God of Sleep, Golden Crescent, Golden Triangle, Greece, grunge, gunpowder, hashish, herbs, heroin, heroin chic, heroin flicks, heroin subculture, Hippocrates, hipsters, history, Hollywood actors, homeless, Hong Kong, ideology, India, Islamic merchants, jazz, jazz artists, joy, junkies, KMT, Kosovo Liberation Army, Kuomintang, Latino community ghettoes, Laudanum, legal opiates, legal privileges, mafias, Marseilles, medicine, merchandise, merchants, Mesopotamia, metal, Mexico, militancy, monopolies, morphine, movie subgenre, musicians, narcos, narcotics, nausea, nodding, Northern Ireland, NSA, occult, opiate serum, opiates, Opium, opium dens, opium tar, Opium Wars, Orient, pain, plants, poets, poppies, Portuguese naval empire, prescriptions, prison gulag, punk, Qing Dynasty, radicalized youth, rebellions, rebels, Red Army Faction, release, Renaissance, rock artists, rock music, romantics, scientists, Second British Empire, sensuality, Shanghai, skinniness, slaves, smoking, spice sellers, squatters, suffering, sugar, sweet death, Taiping Rebellion, the Americas, the State, Thomas de Quincey, trade, tramps, Turkey, unknown pains, urban areas, US Indochina invasion, weight loss, withdrawls, youth resistance
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Our English word for drug comes from the French word, ‘drogue.’ La drogue signified merchandise, but not just any merchandise commonly found in the markets of seventeenth-century Marseilles, France. This merchandise, like the other dangerous concoctions around the world, came from the Orient, or Asia. ‘Epiciers,’ or the spice sellers, legally sold this occult, hard stuff.

This drogue was a peculiarly special medicine, and not just for the ailing. It was really for those unfortunate, bedridden sick, dying from terrible and unknown pains. La drogue always sat ready for its desperate takers. It willfully took flight with its sacrificial victims onto the sweet ride of death.

Writing of death, the decade of the 1830s was an exceptional period for the ruthless scavenger cloaked in the monk’s robe, sporting the skull face and carrying the European peasant’s scythe. But this look of death was a bit more distinct and sensual. It didn’t fume the rancid Euro-sailor reek that made most foreigners almost vomit. It smelled more like a long pipe of sweet-smelling tar mixed with tobacco, or even cannabis. Accompanying this drug of the sweet death, was a deep aroma of British gunpowder and the bad death.

The greatest drug dealers in human history have not been the Colombian or Mexican narcos-cartels, nor the Afghan poppy bosses of the Golden Crescent, nor even the Kuomintang plant lords of the Golden Triangle; instead, the greatest drug dealers in human history have been two humongous Empires found in world history: the Second British Empire, (1783-1956), and the current Amerikan Empire, (the USA), with special emphases on its intelligence services, both the CIA and the DEA, or the Drug Enforcement Administration.

Within the dens and markets on the dirty South Pacific sea, off the coast of China, such as Hong Kong, existed the Imperial Trade. The time was around the 1830s. The British ran the Trade and controlled most the monopolies on the Trade. Other Europeans and European-colonials also participated in the madness, and just like the days of African slavery.

That sinister trade in humans meant the Black Gold kidnapped on the ‘dark continent,’ and then murdered en mass on the American continents during the 1700s. But this latter trade flourished under a stickier commodity.

The Qing Dynasty in China could not tolerate such attacks to its honor and dignity. The Europeans had slowly moved into the ports and cities, like Shanghai. Not only did the smelly and untrustworthy Europeans move in, but they stayed and demanded special ‘rights,’ or legal privileges for their dopey merchants.

The Euros also commanded special monopolies on their sacred commodities. The British, French, Dutch, Americans, Germans, Italians, Russians, and other flush faced monstrosities walked the ancient streets of the Chinese Emperor like demons on parade. The other devious interlopers were Japanese merchants.

The Qing Emperor decided to act and demanded that the British respect his law banning the importation of this other Black Gold, opium, and this time cultivated in Iran, Afghanistan and India. This Black Gold of the nineteenth-century had the infamous name of the Opium Trade.

Like other European colonial thugs before and after, the British East India Company refused to respect the Chinese law in the land of China. Did the British East India Company respect the Americans’ anti-Tea tax rebellions during the Revolutionary War in 1776?

The British already had the tea, and very soon, tea drinking became part of British middle class culture, with creamy milk added, and which is still widely popular in Britain today. But what about the millions of Chinese addicts visiting the dirty dens infested with bed bugs, so they could the smoke the magical pipe and hopefully – die the sweet death?

Britain weighed its options carefully, and decided that it could defeat the once great Chinese Qing Emperor. They were right. The British fought at least two full-scale wars against the corrupt and decadent, Chinese imperial court, murdering 50,000 Chinese anti-opium fighters with British rifle musket fire. The evil joke was on the Chinese, since they had first invented gunpowder about a thousand years ago! The British monopolists also took the port island city of Hong Kong, which they would not return to China until 1997.

China meanwhile began to drown within its own loss of face. The Taiping Rebellion would burst against the hated and dishonest European ‘buyers and sellers.’ Even with that defeat, the Chinese organized themselves into even more powerful secret societies, such as the Boxers, which also led to a full-on rebellion – and later, the Chinese Nationalist Revolution. With the Communist victory of 1949, the Chinese finally instituted real land reforms and ousted the European invaders from its territories – except for the cities of Hong Kong and Macao.

The worst slap in the face for China were the millions of pathetic addicts that lost their wills to live. How many lives and dignities snuffed themselves out for the light smoke of the sweet death?

But the colonial murderers and liars had the last laughs pitted against them. The Chinese opium den culture spread throughout the world’s cultures. Chinatowns opened up flea bag hotels for desperate Chinese workers trying to make some capital through slave wage work across the globe. Within these ‘Chinatowns,’ opium dens flourished, from Lima, Peru to San Francisco, California, from London to Penang, from Paris to Bangkok. A new class of ‘druggie’ entered the darkened smoking lairs.

In the late nineteenth-century, the rooms reeked of the strange blackened tar smoke, the interior decor was of dreary stained long mirrors, red burgundy-brown sienna peeling rice paper, and on the floor red burgundy, phony silk pillows and cushions. If the place had more ‘class,’ then they added dressing partitions and fans for the customers.

The customers were often Europeans, of both sexes, and many came from good class backgrounds and education. Some of them seemed to have that ‘bohemian’ look on them. What attracted those Euro-bohemians to the smoky dens once found in the rat and bug infested holes of Hong Kong?

Opium attracted them – and those sensual Chinese dens were only a small part of the Oriental exotic ambience. Opium, Morphine, Heroin and opium’s hundreds of both illegitimate and legitimate offspring, have offered to the world the peaceful nodding sleep, the deliverance from acute human suffering, both physical and mental, and the sweet death for the melancholic and hard life. The ultimate narcotic is for the dying, for those that desperately want to die, and for those that want to explore their own marvelous and sensual deaths.

For the evil empires of our modern world, and especially for the Amerikan Empire of Sociopaths, opium and its derivatives, with the refined genius of the permanently illegal Heroin, have become golden weapons in the marked arms of intelligence agencies. They are the finest weapons in the subduing of armies, of entire dangerous populations – and they have worked properly every single time – and still do until this very day.

Heroin still retains its status as the artist, traveler and outlaw drug in the Euro-American world of bohemians and rebels. For most of Heroin’s history, most addicts were often men. Yet recently, thousands of attractive young women, and often in their teens, have discovered the occult power of heroin in successfully controlling body weight. Only heroin can offer the female desire for the eating of sweets while retaining the skinny body frame. The sight of a woman’s dark and scrawny heroin body, or ‘heroin chic,’ offers the most profound sensual attraction of the dangerous ‘fashion model.’ Such is the strange and long history of the poppy plant first cultivated and traded in Mesopotamian Asia about 5,000 years ago.

The Sumerians traders referred to the poppies as the joy plants. Their brisk trade in joy, and the sweet death, made them welcome commodities in Ancient Egypt, the Phoenician coastal cities, and within the Greek city states. The ancient medical writer and philosopher, Hippocrates, referred to this plant as a good medicinal herb against pain, internal disorders and acute diarrhea.

Islamic merchants controlled the first opium monopoly during the medieval period, (800-1600 A.D.). Meanwhile, Europeans feared the drug’s ‘oriental’ powers. Opium growing spread to the Mediterranean climate, and especially into Egypt and Turkey, with another lethal commoditized drug, sugar.

Things changed swiftly during the Renaissance period, when the Portuguese traders, and later Dutch merchants, started to cut into the great Muslim traders’ monopoly of the plant. The Dutch even invented the offshoot of Opium, Laudanum, which mixed the poppies in liquor in order to deaden the bitter taste.

In the 1800s, a German doctor manufactured another derivative of Opium, called Morphine, named after the Greek God of sleep, Morpheus. Official medical doctors still legally use this drug as the last medicine for the dying. At the end of the nineteenth-century, a scientist working for the Bayer Company, would find the most powerful derivative of Morphine, called Heroin. In the early 1900s, when the Eugenics ideology moved into center stage, European and American governments banned the opiate serums.

Heroin has lately become the weapon exemplar for intelligence agencies, and especially in the US. After the loss of China in 1949, the western Kuomintang, or the KMT, helped by the CIA, fled into the Golden Triangle zone, (northern Thailand, Burma and Laos), and began to fund their terrorism against Communist China with Heroin profits. The eastern KMT took over the island of Formosa. The KMT thugs renamed it Taiwan, and established a notorious dictatorship continually supported by the Amerikan Empire as a cheap manufacturing base, and which still survives today.

What to do with all the Heroin production in the 1950s? The Amerikan Empire intelligence complex flooded African-American poor, urban neighborhoods with the dope, in order to destroy the growing militancy in the ghettos, such as the Copts and the Nation of Islam.

The CIA did not stop here. During the Amerikan Imperial invasion of Indochina, (1961-1975), the intelligence assets began the Air America scheme to transport Heroin from the Golden Triangle region and make some incredible profits. Where did they drop the dope in late 60s and early 70s? Again, they hit the African-American, poor urban areas hard and the urban Latino communities. The Black Panthers tried to fight back, but the FBI had them exterminated. The dope also found its street cred among radicalized returning US veterans and in the countercultural, hipster zones, such as the Lower East Side, NYC, and in Haight-Ashbury, San Francisco. LSD-Acid had its days, and so the dope killed the fun.

In the 1980s, while the CIA and NSA worked with major Crack-Cocaine importers from Latin America, they helped restart the Golden Crescent zone of Afghanistan and Pakistan, in order to debilitate the Russian armies fighting the Mujahedeen fighters.

And now, with the Amerikan imperial invasion and occupation of Afghanistan, Heroin is showing up everywhere. The Amerikan Empire’s intelligence agencies are dumping the stuff across the small remaining outposts of middle class, ‘white skin privilege’ Amerika. They don’t care where it goes anymore.

Of course, they are still getting help from their narco brothers across the southern border, and from every Mafia group found inside and outside of the US, including ‘the Kosovo Liberation Army,’ the same group of hired thugs the Amerikan Empire supported against Serbia in the 1990s. Joy to the imperial state and mafia criminals!

Other European intelligence agencies have also used the secretive dope weapon. When Italy and Germany began to heat up with youth resistance in the 1970s, such as the RAF, or the Red Army Faction, and the Red Brigades, all of sudden, cheap dope hit the youth scene. When nationalist youth fought furiously in Northern Ireland and in the Basque Country in the 1980s, the IRA and ETA nationalist fighting wings had to start hunting the dope pushers. Greece is the most youth radicalized country in Europe, and there, copious amounts of cheap dope flood the urban streets of Athens.

Why are rebellious youth attracted to the product in the first place? The answers lie in the sensuality of the sweet death, eternal sleep, permanent illegality of the most potent narcotic, and the heroin chic montage of eternal skinniness and authentic cool rebellion.

From the nineteenth-century, European Bohemia began to dabble inside the Opium dens. Some became rabid smokers, while others became ‘opium eaters.’ Oscar Wilde vividly described a literary scene where the eternally young, Dorian Gray, regularly visited the ‘London clubs.’ The French Romantic poet, Charles Baudelaire, fell into a severe Opium addiction while living in decadent Paris. He mellowed out his withdrawals with copious Hashish smoking. Other romantic Opiate dabblers were Thomas de Quincey, Lord Byron, Percy Shelley and Elizabeth Barrett Browning.

In the twentieth-century, when music took hold of European and American youth imagination with jazz, rock and its subgenres of metal, grunge and punk, Heroin embraced its newfound artist friends. Almost the entirety of America’s great jazz musicians got hooked into the Heroin miasma, such as Coltrane, Parker, Baker, Monk, Davis, Charles and Holliday. With Rock it has been about the same, and it is still this way. Some of the tragic deaths of numerous rock stars have had their connections to the Opiate serum. Even Hollywood actors have taken the Heroin plunge, such as Alma Rubens, Wallace Reid, Bela Lugosi, Montgomery Clift, John Belushi, Robert Pastorelli, River Phoenix, Chris Farley and Phillip Seymour.

Writing about the movies, an entire subgenre of cinema has explored the cool, pretty junkie, illegal drug, heroin subculture of squatters, traveling addicts, outlaws and tramps, such as ‘Trainspotting, Sid and Nancy, Candy, The Panic in Needle Park, Jesus’ Son, Requiem for a Dream, Gia, Christiana F, Gridlock’d, Basketball Diaries, Permanent Midnight,’ and ‘Drugstore Cowboy.’

Most importantly, Heroin has recently found another home among female models and handsome young women that don’t want to deal with the contemporary mental and physical pains of having to continually losing weight and staying thin. They have discovered that regular yoga workouts and vegetarian fad diets require enormous amounts of personal discipline and struggle. They are too sensitive for such fighting, so they have uncovered another secret weapon to keeping thin – the romantic life of the fringe drug addict. Heroin chic truly is chic, and in our modern world, it is here to stay.

And so here is the strange and fascinating history of the Opium drug. Across the globe millions of working class addicts have to struggle daily in order to feed their brutal habits and avoid the horrible withdrawals. Wealthy addicts have their stable connects, can simply shoot the medicine in their rooms, and die peacefully in their homes. Official doctors can prescribe various ‘legal opiates,’ such as Codeine, Vicodin, Fentanyl, Demerol, Suboxone, Percodan, Oxycontin and Dilaudid; while some unfortunate street peddlers now rot in the Amerikan gulag.

Its origins, like Cannabis, come from the exotic, mystical and occult Orient. At present, Heroin flourishes everywhere on the planet. A strange social concoction of artists, intelligence agents, musicians, disreputable politicians, poets, mafiosi and models have fallen in love with the poppy plant, yet Heroin offers the deep mental-physical release to all that use it. This utopia mixed with exaltation ultimately explains its rampant popularity worldwide. And finally, it relieves all physical and mental suffering – leading us all to the sweet death.

 

Gun-Cleaning-Picbore snakerifleshotgun partsrevolver handgunsemi handgun

I once spoke with a gunsmith about the usual issues that people had brought to him concerning their malfunctioning weapons. The owners often went out for a day of shooting and then suddenly, the rifle or pistol jammed on him or her. These particular pistols and rifles were hardly ever used tools, or the owners stored them in some closet, basement or garage structure.

The owners had hoped that the weapons would work, but often the guns seemed to not function at the correct times. The gunsmith told me plainly that the main problem was that the owners had just forgot to clean their rarely used weapons. The gunsmith had to charge them a steep fee for working on the guns – but a good cleaning, after such a long time of non-use, might have avoided those gunsmith visits.

After a fun day of shooting with friends, or plinking at old cans, bottles, metal boxes and broken televisions in the desert, I used to dread the cleaning ritual. I didn’t like the process of having to check my guns, once again, for any live rounds in the chambers, and then the full disassembly process of the weapons. With my rifles, sometimes a little spring piece would jut out of nowhere and fall somewhere on the floor. Looking for that annoying, tiny piece on the floor somewhere – bothered me greatly.

And then it was the straight on cleaning, with the barrel cleaning taking up most of my time. The worst part was the reassembly because I always had trouble fitting the bolt back into the action of the rifle chamber. In the past, I ‘ve had to call friends over my place, so they could help me out with such mundane tasks.

Recently however, I have overcome the dread of cleaning my weapons. Part of this transformation was due to recognizing the natural, human laziness in doing any cleaning at all. For those of us that enjoy cooking, the washing up and drying of cookware, plates, cups and utensils is not that much fun either. But this is a part of living, and cleaning is one of the actions of light that brings us more peace and happiness.

We clean our anuses and ass cheeks after excreting feces, so we material beings also need to clean our tools for whatever purposes after having used them. We can also embrace cleaning as a virtuous art in itself.

Yes, it takes up time and the wiping actions are quite monotonous, but it is simply another stage in our lives. We can do our cleaning well and thereby, keep using our tools, shelters and bodies in good health. Cleaning is an honorable act of accomplishment. It signifies our basic love for ourselves, where we currently reside, and the instruments in our lives that are important to us.

Before I buy a weapon, I always ask the seller to show me how to clean the thing. I have found that weapons cleaning has helped me learn more about that particular weapon. While I clean the different parts, I can see how the firing pin hits the brass or steel cartridge, how the guide rod helps engage the bolt and the round, how the hammer cock moves the trigger, how the slide assembly moves the bolt, or how the trigger aligns with the action chamber.

This is the most important lesson with cleaning the weapon. The more we clean our weapons, the more accustomed we become to disassembly, viewing the different mechanisms in firing, and reassembly. We transform ourselves into the experts of our very own tools for the martial arts. If we were to engage with live firing during a red alert scenario, then we would feel a lot more comfortable in using our chosen guns. I could not imagine the horrible feeling of dread, while using an unknown weapon during hot combat. Cleaning the weapon will kill that dread.

Before cleaning our weapons, we could set up a special section for the cleaning. Gunpowder, lead and grease will spill and fall out, so we need some backup surfaces for the work. I normally lay out some old fabrics on the table. I also put on elastic hand gloves, to avoid the lead residue getting all over my hands.

I make sure the weapon’s safety is on. I lay the weapon horizontal on the fabrics, with the barrel muzzle facing out, towards a wall facing the outside, (not someone else’s apartment or house), and I grab the weapon’s manual user’s guide. I look up disassembly.

I next move the slide back and check the chamber to see if there is possibly a live round inside. In the past, I have discovered live rounds in the chamber before cleaning, so this is an important and necessary step. After double-checking the safety in the on position and making sure the chamber is free of rounds, I disassemble the weapon. I have found that disassembly is a lot quicker than the reassembly.

Once the weapon is completely disassembled, I lay the different parts out on the fabrics, and then I grab the necessary cleaning tools from the gun cleaning kit. The first thing to clean, and the hardest, is the barrel bore since it has the lead and gunpowder residue inside of it. For the barrels, I now use bore snakes, which are long fabrics that you put in the bore of the rifle, while sprinkling a little gun cleaning oil on the fabric. You pull the bore snake line from the barrel muzzle end, (where the bullet exits), for cleaning. I have had to do this method a couple of times for a good clean. I next inspect the barrel from the muzzle end, in the light, to see if the bore is clear of dirty obstructions. For handguns, I use a thin rod with a brush on the end. I put a little oil on the brush and move it back and forth inside the bore.

Around the barrel and receiver chamber, I use a gun cleaning toothbrush with a little gun oil. I try to get rid of the black soot crap. Following this, I use small white pads with a little oil around the area. I also like to use Q-Tips in the hard to reach spots. At the end, I like to pass a clean white pad, and later, clean Q-Tips around the whole barrel and receiver part. When I feel the whole barrel complex is free from most of the soot, I then move to the bolt.

I clean the bolt with the gun cleaning toothbrush and a little oil. Afterwards, I rub the oiled white pads and Q-Tips on it, and especially around the firing pin area to get rid of the real dirty areas. For the revolvers, I clean the cylinder chambers with a round wire brush and gun oil. I gently wipe around the revolver’s ejecting rod.

I also lightly clean the breech, (the back of the gun), hammer-trigger assemblies, slides, and guide rod-coils with a bit of oil, some white pads, and Q-Tip rubbing. The last part I clean is the whole rifle or handgun, including the stock, the forestock, the magazine area, and the trigger guard with a little oil and some white pads. Finally, I wipe down the different parts with a silicone cloth that gives the weapon a nice, overall clean look.

Now comes the hard part – reassembly. For handguns, this part is not that hard, but for rifles, I usually have my issues inserting the bolt properly into the action chamber area. Although, the reassembly is sometimes frustrating, the practice of reassembly makes the gun owner a better handler of the tool. I have gotten faster in my reassembly skills over the years.

Once the rifle and handgun is fully assembled, check to make sure the slide or pump, and the bolt move easily in the action-chamber. I always do a final wipe with the silicon cloth around the whole weapon. I check to make sure that the safety is still on, thereupon, I lock the weapon and store it in a safe place.

During this whole cleaning ritual, I always reexamine the cleaned parts. Once I view the completely cleaned weapon, which is ready for storage, a great feeling washes over me. I have taken care of my precious tool. This is not an act of love for my guns, but an act of love for being a good artist. A good artist cherishes his or her instruments for both creation and destruction. This is part of the magic of life – expertise in handling tools.