Archive for the ‘pistols’ Category

indoor rangewoman-at-gun-rangeOutdoor rangerifle sightsshooting target

Gun ammunition is not cheap, but the non-practice of self-defense encourages terrible consequences within the foreseeable future.

If we own guns, we all must do some live firing gun practice. At home snap cap use, or dummy round practice, is important too. Yet, live fire does not hide our flaws when shooting, and we all have them.

Live fire also exposes our deficiencies in gun safety, the handling of firearms and the proper cleaning of weapons. Even when our weapons jam, live fire will put our knowledge of tap, rack, reload, and if that doesn’t work: safety, lock, release, into action. The only way we can zero in our rifle sights for better shooting accuracy is with live firing.

An important truth to live firing is that it is better to go alone, then join a group of unknown shooters, even if the live fire outing was the idea of a friend of a friend. Doing live fire with annoying ‘gun dudes,’ and a lot of them are out there, can make a fun day of shooting into an experience of pure suffering.

You are still shooting live rounds – which can destroy human life within seconds. Do not risk your personal safety, nor your personal freedom, by visiting a live fire range with other unknown shooters. Even good friendships can strain when going out for a day of live fire shooting.

One time in the distant past, I remember going out live fire shooting in the desert with a bunch of guys who I did not know beforehand. While it was my turn to fire, a good shooter commented to me on my lack of hitting the target, and he showed me some good gun handling pointers, which made my accuracy a lot better.

Live fire shooting at the range is necessary for becoming a better marksman. It is expensive, loud and messy, but all shooters must practice at the range. The well-practiced range shooter will also know how to deal with gun jams, misfires, using good ammunition versus the cheap crap loads, and how to parlay cover tactics when firing shots at the enemy. Live firing is also the ideal spot to test out newly purchased rifles and pistols.

Live firing is basically a solo practice in order to improve accuracy and gun handling. The range should not become a social event however, nor should any alcohol or drug use enter into the activities.

Live fire shooting must adhere to the strictest practices within gun safety protocols.

Before driving to the range, the shooter needs to purchase lots of ammunition for the weapons. Regular ammunition loads are sufficient. Shooters should avoid unknown ammunition or bullets recently reloaded from untrusted shooters. Reloaded rounds work well when offered from proven experts who use reloading procedures, or when purchased from experienced gunsmiths.

The shooter must possess both ear plugs and ear headphones. Another time I went shooting, I remember having to cover my ears every time this guy shot his 308. I was only wearing cheap ear plugs.

The other required safety equipment includes safety glasses, and if it is a very sunny day, sun glasses. All shooters must wear hats, (baseball caps are good), for when the bullet brass or steel kicks back to the head – which it always does.

When at the shooting bays, shooters always point their weapons’ barrels down range, or when not shooting, the weapon barrels lie either facing up or down on the rifle racks. Remember, all guns are loaded.

The most important safety procedure at the range is never firing until every person at the bay says it is OK. Before live firing, each shooter has to make sure that the others are also shooting their weapons. Once a shooter signals to the other range people that he needs to post, check or remove a target, then all the other shooters must stop shooting and remove their weapons facing down range.

Shooters should also remember that firing hundreds of rounds of ammunition can lead to overheating of the barrel and the chamber bore. It is important to rest one rifle or pistol after shooting many rounds, and then practice with other weapons. Most shooters bring at least the majority of their weapons to the range in order to practice as much as possible.

Marksmen can also practice ducking for cover and then shooting, moving and shooting, and shooting from the hip, kneeling, or standing, or even lying in the prone shooter position. All of these tactics make for better gun handling. Regular practice and good effort work. The most important part is actually getting to the place for gun shooting. Whether it is target practice, the indoor pistol range, or just plinking in the desert destroying old televisions, practicing increases gun skill.

After live fire shooting, the gun practitioners need to take a shower, wash their clothes and clean their firearms. One of the negatives of live firing is the amount of lead residues on the clothes, body and hair, after all of the gunpowder found inside the rounds.

Some shooters like to clean their weapons while on the range right after shooting. I do not like this method because disassembly and reassembly of weapons can turn into a messy assignment. What if that small pin of my rifle falls into the sand or dust? What if I try to remove a gun piece and there is still a round in the chamber, or I had forgotten to remove the magazine? I do not want to risk any negligent discharges at the gun range.

Live fire range shooting represents the finality of practice transformed into the role of action. Every time we live fire our weapons, they become more familiar and more personal to our hands, bodies and minds. Eventually, our weapons will become extensions of our arms, hand, eyes – and our minds.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black Panthers protest against CA gun lawsGirl open carry copy 2Open Carry protest against racismopen_carry_gunHow our enemies see usarrested-texas-open-carry-protest

Nostalgia for past historical epochs is often due to people’s desires for the future, rather than a true yearning for the distant past.

A good example has represented the American Wild West with its legends, cinema genre, TV shows, comics, museums, historical reenactments and tourist trap towns across the western US. Visitors want to see, smell and taste the real thing: a chuck roast baking over the grill, the old smell of black gunpowder, touching an old Colt six-gun revolver or a Winchester lever-action repeating rifle, the dilapidated wooden homes found in ghost towns and walking into a real live saloon with shutter doors, and a long wooden bar with lots of whiskey and sweet wine. The card tables now exist inside of casinos.

Some locals-touts in the tourist trap towns still dress that old way, with the cowboy boots, big rimmed hats, long overcoats, pants held up with suspenders, shirts done with bolo ties, and a few even have leather chaps and spurs, as if they just dismounted off a horse.

They even act their parts with the long hair, the long moustaches and the stubble on the chin. Meanwhile, the women have that late nineteenth-century Victorian style dress – inclusive of blouses, small vest jackets, heeled shoes, pant undergarments and corsets, with their long hair done up in those old Progressive era buns and curls. Both the men and the women like their whiskey and tobacco, but there is always one thing missing during the reenactments – the guns.

As a historian, I can definitely state that most people openly carried guns during the American Wild West days. Not all cowboys, ranchers, merchants and barkeepers carried weapons on them, but enough did to make life a lot more polite than our contemporary times. A lot more men than women carried pistols on their hips, but most farm women had their shotguns ready for action – if some bad guys came around the bend. This was especially true in the South and in the West.

About a hundred and forty years ago, not much time in the grand history of our planet, open gun carrying in the US was just about as common as putting on one’s own clothes. It was not just the Wild West that had people carrying weapons, but also the big cities in America, such as New York City, Chicago and San Francisco.

What happened to those days? Well, the United States has become a mostly urban population base. The local dictator, urban politicians don’t like having armed populations walking around – except for the city’s police forces. Where there exists lots of monopoly capitalism, city hall corruption, high taxes, and police state injustice, all of which now thrive in those massive megalopolises, people feel alienated, angry, frustrated, and the rage begins to fry on high heat.

In order to strike fear into those urban populations, the local, ‘elected’ tyrants run prisons that resemble torture centers, while the local police act more like paramilitary forces. So far, this method of social control seems to have worked out just fine.

America’s large urban populations survive as disarmed marks. Dastardly rudeness and institutional violence run rampant in those cities, and the regular citizens have to look over their shoulders when walking alone in the dark, crossing into an unknown area, or when entering their buildings. The urban politicians and elites get bodyguards, real police protection, and easy concealed weapons licenses, while the urban wage slaves can hopefully buy a spay canister of mace.

There are a few large cities in America where people can still legally open carry, but most police normally stop the open carriers and ask them for identification. A few times, the police have actually arrested the people and have taken away their weapons – never to return the weapons to the original owners. Type ‘open carry detain arrest’ on YouTube and you can watch the horrendous videos exposing such legal injustice.

Some businesses now ban open carrying on their premises, and the laws in many ‘gun friendly’ states often prohibit open carrying on school, government and post office properties.

I have even watched pro-gun guys with YouTube channels saying publicly that open carrying is stupid. Many Americans admire the days of the Wild West, yet open carrying has the reputation of an old, bygone historical era.

I believe that if we gun owners want to keep our cultural power inside of the United States, then open carrying must continue. If one lives in an anti-open carrying state, then the gun people can form an open carrying group to publicly walk around and hopefully change the law.

Like the days of the Wild West, people acted with a lot more prudence, and behaved with better manners. There were just as many rude nasty types, sinister outlaws in those days, just like in our current days. This is the reason for the nostalgia of the Wild West: people could defend their honor and their life without having to ask the State for permission. Only two social groups in the actual United States now have that freedom.

The first group represents the upper level economic and political elites, such as owners and major stockholders of multinational corporations, old money inheritance trust funders, high court judges, a few top celebrities, military generals and admirals, and top-heavy, well-connected politicians. The second group revolves around the state gangs, such as Federal government officials that carry weapons, such as FBI and CIA agents-spies, and the multiple law enforcement-police forces found across the land. Prison guards also have the right to use their arms with corresponding legal immunities, yet only when working inside the prison walls.

The rest of the population, meaning us, have to fear the terrible vengeance and brutal fury of the State.

The Open Carry of firearms is still a revolutionary act. It is open for all to see and it simply states that the armed person will defend him or herself. Most importantly, open carrying informs the non-gun owning public that we have history on our side. Guns have always been an important part of American culture – and we will make sure that they stay that way.

The less open carrying that regular citizens see on the streets, the more the fear of guns predominates within the general population, while the open carrying of firearms by police forces and government agents seems quite normal. If this status quo continues, the future of guns in American culture will find a notorious reputation.

Some of the non-gun owning public perceives guns through a dangerous black and white scenario: either the good guys, the cops, carry guns, or the bad guys, the criminals, use guns. We know that this is not true – but if the regular people never open carry, then this plot might become the actuality.

If we still have our Second amendment rights, then gun owners should exercise them. The most powerful method is the open carry of a loaded firearm on the hip. This includes a sturdy belt that slides into the holster. The holster needs to have a clip or a fastener in order to hold the firearm snugly inside the holster pocket. This type of holster keeps the firearm in place eliminating any fear of the firearm dropping, falling, hitting the ground or negligently discharging a round.

A firearm that drops out of a cheap, unfastened holster, falls down to the ground, and might negligently fire – and even kill someone, destroying the lives of both the open carrier and the victim. Anti-gun Liberal-Leftist fascists use those accidents to defame all of us. With this right to open carry comes the responsibility of handling a tool that terminates life on a trigger squeeze.

When we publicly open carry, eyes begin to glance at us, so we should not look too bizarre or eccentric. Whatever side our firearm is on, then we should not play around with that side or nervously dabble our fingers across the holster. The holster is simply another part of our clothes.

I personally place my keys and other stuff inside the other pants pocket that doesn’t have the holster by it. I do not use the pants pocket on the side of the holster. When visiting a bar or any place where I plan to drink booze, I do not open carry. For me, alcohol, bar-restaruant patrons, and guns don’t mix.

And finally, the Hollywood movie version of the double dueling desperado with the two-gun holsters on both hips is simply a myth. I’m sure a few outlaws might have used that method, but most of them probably didn’t live that long to write about it.

I have only recently openly carried, and I have not had any problems with business owners or the police – yet. What saddens me greatly is that I live in a western state that has legal open carry of firearms, and I have seen very few people open carrying in the town that I currently live in. The few open carriers have been either the employees who work at the local gun store, or once and while, a guy just coming back from the range or hunting.

Open carriers ought to stick together, and hopefully with more visibility of open carry, we can invite other courageous people to join the open carry movement representing men and women, diverse ethnicities, creeds, and sexual orientations.

This last part is important because the anti-gun Liberal fascists in the corporate media like to stereotype us as a bunch of white male, super heterosexual, super macho, right-wing asshole, fat guys with genetically attached baseball caps carrying the symbol of ignorance magically stamped across our foreheads. The big city despots in America can curse us all they want, but we stand firm as free, courageous and armed people who are not scared to exercise our rights. Most importantly, we know our own history.

 

 

snap-capssnapcapshotgun snap capDry-Fire-Snap-Capsdry fire practieproper handling of weapon at home

Reaching goals and finishing the work that we had originally organized for ourselves are all marvelous accomplishments. But regular practice matters too, and even when it seems to fall into redundancy and repetitive boredom. The art of regular practice also brings its future rewards and adds a nice structure to our lives.

Within the martial arts of guns, one great practice represents the use of snap caps. They are hard polymer plastic, bullet lookalikes, and they are often of burgundy red color. Gun stores usually sell them in all pistol, shotgun and rifle gauges: from .22 rounds to .45 rounds, from 10 gauge to 30 gauge, and from .17 rounds to .308 rounds.

In the Wild West Days of the States, about a hundred and forty years ago, cowboys, farmers, ranchers, soldiers, warriors, outlaws, bandidos, circus performers, cooks, miners, sheriffs, posses, and all sorts of other types, regularly practiced their dry firing techniques in order to become proficient shooters. They practiced their stances, draw, reach, deholstering, aim, sights, breath, trigger squeeze and holstering their weapons. They didn’t have snap caps in those days, so they had to dry fire without live ammo, or they used live ammo out in the desert, which could get expensive.

The problem with dry firing weapons like the Colt Six Gun Shooter and the Winchester Lever Action Repeating Rifle was that dry firing eventually dulled the firing pin and the trigger mechanism. The hard metal on metal hits, and without any live ammo to give some type of cushion, weakened the weapons’ performance. Imagine going into real combat with some real live ammo – and not having your weapon work properly. This was one of the real and terrible fears of gunslingers back in those days.

Live firing with snap caps is a safe and effective technique for acquiring the martial arts of firearm use.

Now we shooters are lucky in that snap caps allow us to practice in our homes without worrying about severe noise or destroying our weapons through dry firing without anything between the firing pin and the trigger mechanism or bolt-action area. The snap cap has the same shape of the real bullet, except it doesn’t explode and it is perfect for receiving the force of the firing mechanism.

These days, visiting the live fire gun range is expensive, unless you have access to someone’s land for shooting or live near a free use shooting range. But even the amount of ammo normally used in one day of shooting is not cheap. Many shooters go through hundreds of rounds, firing most of their weapons, such as rifles, shotguns and pistols.

The dry firing technique at home with snap caps allows the shooter the ability to practice in private and not have to spend a great deal of money during one day of live fire. Nothing beats the actual practice and skill building of live firing however. But snap caps allow that reinforcement of good skills, which can eventually help produce a good shooting day at the range.

At home, I often practice with snap caps in particular situations. For example, I will use snap caps for dealing with potential jams, malfunctions or stovepipes in my weapons, then practicing safety drills, clearing the jams, and return firing.

I use the snap caps for stance, holstering, drawing the weapons, sight alignment, aim, breathing, proper trigger squeezing and holstering my weapon once again. I will often practice shooting the weapon with one hand, and then with two hands. With my pistols, I like to switch back and forth between left and right hands. Sometimes, while I was live firing, I have heeled, anticipated or flinched when shooting my weapons. I use the dry firing of snap caps to help correct such bad shooting habits.

At home, I also practice imaginary self-defense scenarios, where I move out of cover and try shooting back at a target, or reaching for a weapon nearby when doing another task, such as Internet surfing, and then facing a serious threat, and immediately afterwards, returning quick succession of dry fire. Dry firing with snap caps is not that loud, except for the movement of bolt metal in the chamber. I still use ear plugs with my dry fire practice however.

Snap caps are very simple to use because the shooter simply loads the snap caps like normal live bullets into the chamber or magazine. The racking and ejecting of the snap caps is often the same as live firing with brass, steel and shotgun casings. Instead of a used casing flying out, the snap cap ejects completely.

Before going to your weapons for dry firing snap caps, use the safety protocols. The number one protocol is to check the weapon for any live cartridges in the chambers and in the magazines. I like to leave green zip ties in the chamber-bore area after doing a dry firing round.

The main safety concerns with snap caps refer to keeping the caps in a completely separate place from the live ammo. All live ammo should have its special place for storage in your private abode. Nothing could be worse than to have your snap caps lying around near the live ammo, and then mistakenly loading a live cartridge or cartridges with the snap caps.

The sound and damage of a live round going off in your home could ruin your life forever. These terrible negligent discharges do happen. Keep all snap caps in a particular site for regular dry firing practice. Store the live ammo in a completely different area of your house.

The other safety concern is just getting finger tired, bored or lazy. After dry firing repeatedly, the mind can start to lose its awareness. This is the time to stop the snap cap practice and return to it for another day.

With the amount of money spent driving out to the range and going through lots of ammunition, the dry firing of snap caps allows gun owners to practice the martial arts of firearms within a place of residence.